Between Cloud, Mobility and the Enterprise is the API Middle Ground

Scott Morrison

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When Is the Cloud Not a Cloud?

What we so enthusiastically label cloud will just be the way everyone builds and deploys their apps

Sometimes I joke that as my kids grow up they won’t see clouds, they’ll just see air—meaning of course that their use of cloud-based services will become so ubiquitous as to make the cloud moniker largely unnecessary. What we so enthusiastically label cloud will just be the way everyone builds and deploys their apps. “Nothing to see here folks; but look at my wonderful new application…”

We won’t arrive at this future until we strip the word cloud of its power. And to do this, we need to go after the things we thought made cloud unique and special in the first place. Today, Amazon took a vicious swipe at the canonical definition by introducing dedicated EC2 instances. Dedicating hardware to a single customer addresses the next logical layer in the hierarchy of security concerns after virtual isolation. Amazon’s VPC product, introduced back in August 2009, provided virtualized isolation in their multi-tenant environment. Essentially VPC is like a virtual zone housing only your instances. This zone is tied back to your on-premise network using a VPN. The only way in or out of a zone is through your corporate network. Other Amazon-resident applications can not access your apps directly—in fact, any external app, Amazon-resident or otherwise—must go through your conventional corporate security perimeter and route back to Amazon over the VPN to be able to gain access to a VPC app. The real value of VPC is that it puts instance access back into the hands of the corporate security group.

The problem that the highly security conscious organization has with VPC is that the “V” is for virtual. VPC may implement clever isolation tricks using dynamic VLANs and hypervisor magic known only to a gifted few, but when your critical application loads up you may actually reside on exactly the same hardware as your own worst enemy. In theory, neither of you can exploit this situation. But you need to believe the theory. Completely.

Today’s announcement means that Amazon’s customers can literally have exclusive use of hardware. This is good news for anyone with reservations about hypervisor isolation. However, the networking remains virtualized, and of course you can still ask the classic cloud security questions about where data resides, or the background of the staff running the infrastructure. So a mini-private cloud, it is not; but dedicated instances is an interesting offering, nonetheless.

What is more intriguing is that by providing dedicated hardware, Amazon is beginning to erode one of the basic foundations of the canonical cloud definition: multi-tenancy. Purists will argue—as they do so with unexpected vehemence with regard to private cloud—that what Amazon is offering is not a cloud at all, but in fact a retrograde step back to simple hosting or co-loc. I’m inclined to disagree, however, and think instead Amazon offers a logical next step (and certainly not the last) in the evolution of cloud services. By doing so, Amazon amplifies some of the other important aspects that define what the cloud really is. Things like self-service, a greatly changed division and scope of operational responsibility, the leverage of commodity of scale, elasticity, and the ability to pay for what you actually use.

I don’t think Amazon’s new offering will be wildly successful because it still leaves many security issues unresolved. But I do think it points the way to the future cloud, which will have many different attributes and characteristics that solve different problems. Some may conflict with traditional definitions and expectations. Some may fulfill them. What is important is to choose the service that meets your needs, and don’t worry what it’s called. That’s marketing’s problem.

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More Stories By Scott Morrison

K. Scott Morrison is the Chief Technology Officer and Chief Architect at Layer 7 Technologies, where he is leading a team developing the next generation of security infrastructure for cloud computing and SOA. An architect and developer of highly scalable, enterprise systems for over 20 years, Scott has extensive experience across industry sectors as diverse as health, travel and transportation, and financial services. He has been a Director of Architecture and Technology at Infowave Software, a leading maker of wireless security and acceleration software for mobile devices, and was a senior architect at IBM. Before shifting to the private sector, Scott was with the world-renowned medical research program of the University of British Columbia, studying neurodegenerative disorders using medical imaging technology.

Scott is a dynamic, entertaining and highly sought-after speaker. His quotes appear regularly in the media, from the New York Times, to the Huffington Post and the Register. Scott has published over 50 book chapters, magazine articles, and papers in medical, physics, and engineering journals. His work has been acknowledged in the New England Journal of Medicine, and he has published in journals as diverse as the IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow, and Neurology. He is the co-author of the graduate text Cloud Computing, Principles, Systems and Applications published by Springer, and is on the editorial board of Springer’s new Journal of Cloud Computing Advances, Systems and Applications (JoCCASA). He co-authored both Java Web Services Unleashed and Professional JMS. Scott is an editor of the WS-I Basic Security Profile (BSP), and is co-author of the original WS-Federation specification. He is a recent co-author of the Cloud Security Alliance’s Security Guidance for Critical Areas of Focus in Cloud Computing, and an author of that organization’s Top Threats to Cloud Computing research. Scott was recently a featured speaker for the Privacy Commission of Canada’s public consultation into the privacy implications of cloud computing. He has even lent his expertise to the film and television industry, consulting on a number of features including the X-Files. Scott’s current interests are in cloud computing, Web services security, enterprise architecture and secure mobile computing—and of course, his wife and two great kids.

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