Between Cloud, Mobility and the Enterprise is the API Middle Ground

Scott Morrison

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Why Cloud Brokers Are the Foundation for the Resilient API Network

Sometimes the simplest patterns are the most effective

Amazon Web Services crashed spectacularly, and with it the illusion that cloud is reliable-by-design and ready for mission-critical applications. Now everyone knows that cloud SLAs fade like the phosphor glow in a monitor when someone pulls the plug from the wall. Amazon’s failure is an unfortunate event, and the cloud will never be the same.

So what is the enterprise to do if it can’t trust its provider? The answer is to take a page from good web architecture and double up. Nobody would deploy an important web site without at least two identical web servers and a load balancer to spray traffic between them. If one server dies, its partner handles the full load until operators can restore the failed system. Sometimes the simplest patterns are the most effective.

Now take a step back and expand this model to the macro-level. Instead of pair of web servers, imagine two different cloud providers, ideally residing on separate power grids and different Internet backbones. Rather than a web server, imagine a replicated enterprise application hosting important APIs. Now replace the load balancer with a Cloud Broker—essentially an intelligent API switch that can distribute traffic between the providers based  both on provider performance and a deep understanding of the nature of each API.

It is this API-centricity that makes a Cloud Broker more than just a new deployment pattern for a conventional load balancer. Engineers design load balancers to direct traffic to Web sites, and their designs excel at this task. But while load balancers do provide rudimentary access to API parameters in a message stream, the rules languages used to articulate distribution policy are just not designed to make effective decisions about application protocols. In a pinch, you might be able to implement simple HTTP fail over between clouds, but this isn’t a very satisfactory solution.

In contrast, we design cloud brokers from the beginning to interpret application layer protocols and to use this insight to optimize API traffic management between clouds. A well-designed cloud broker abstracts existing APIs that may differ between hosts, offering a common view to clients decoupled from local dependencies. Furthermore, Cloud Brokers implement sophisticated orchestration capabilities so they can interact with cloud infrastructure through a provider’s APIs. This allows the broker to take command of applications the provider hosts. Leveraging these APIs, the broker can automatically spin up a new application instance on demand, or release under-utilized capacity. Automation of processes is one of the more important value propositions of cloud, and Cloud Brokers are means to realize this goal.

For more information about Cloud Brokers, have a look at the Cloud Broker product page at Layer 7 Technologies.

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More Stories By Scott Morrison

K. Scott Morrison is the Chief Technology Officer and Chief Architect at Layer 7 Technologies, where he is leading a team developing the next generation of security infrastructure for cloud computing and SOA. An architect and developer of highly scalable, enterprise systems for over 20 years, Scott has extensive experience across industry sectors as diverse as health, travel and transportation, and financial services. He has been a Director of Architecture and Technology at Infowave Software, a leading maker of wireless security and acceleration software for mobile devices, and was a senior architect at IBM. Before shifting to the private sector, Scott was with the world-renowned medical research program of the University of British Columbia, studying neurodegenerative disorders using medical imaging technology.

Scott is a dynamic, entertaining and highly sought-after speaker. His quotes appear regularly in the media, from the New York Times, to the Huffington Post and the Register. Scott has published over 50 book chapters, magazine articles, and papers in medical, physics, and engineering journals. His work has been acknowledged in the New England Journal of Medicine, and he has published in journals as diverse as the IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow, and Neurology. He is the co-author of the graduate text Cloud Computing, Principles, Systems and Applications published by Springer, and is on the editorial board of Springer’s new Journal of Cloud Computing Advances, Systems and Applications (JoCCASA). He co-authored both Java Web Services Unleashed and Professional JMS. Scott is an editor of the WS-I Basic Security Profile (BSP), and is co-author of the original WS-Federation specification. He is a recent co-author of the Cloud Security Alliance’s Security Guidance for Critical Areas of Focus in Cloud Computing, and an author of that organization’s Top Threats to Cloud Computing research. Scott was recently a featured speaker for the Privacy Commission of Canada’s public consultation into the privacy implications of cloud computing. He has even lent his expertise to the film and television industry, consulting on a number of features including the X-Files. Scott’s current interests are in cloud computing, Web services security, enterprise architecture and secure mobile computing—and of course, his wife and two great kids.

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